Weekly Assignment #5

September 21, 2006 at 6:39 pm (Weekly Assignments)

The first part of the weekly assignment is to ask a question about the reading for this week — a real question; i.e., something you don’t know the answer to. ONE sentence only, please: questions of more than one sentence will not receive credit. I might give an extra point for great questions. Questions are due by midnight on Monday. Late questions will not be given credit.

The second part of the weekly assignment is to answer someone’s question (not your own). You must cite at least one authoritative source. (I will withhold credit for answers without a reference. If you make a sui generis argument, find an authority to support it, or else find an authority to testily contradict.) These answers can be as long as you like; I might give an extra point for great answers. Answers are due by midnight on Wednesday. Late answers will not be given credit.

Submit all questions and answers as comments to this post. Feel free to post other commentary in the comments, as well.

Advertisements

Permalink 34 Comments

Class canceled Tuesday

September 17, 2006 at 10:21 am (General)

I need to cancel class for Tuesday morning; we’ll need to do our best to grapple with “In Memoriam” in a single session on Thursday.

As a substitute, you might consider reading T. S. Eliot’s essay on “In Memoriam,” first published in his _Essays, Ancient and Modern_ (London: Faber, 1936). This is the essay where Eliot wrote that “In Memoriam,” despite its tone of spiritual crisis, is a very religious poem “not because of the quality of [Tennyson’s] faith, but because of the quality of his doubt.” It’s available in several books in the library, including the original Faber edition.

See you Thursday.

P.S. Please do post questions and answers on the usual schedule. Thanks.

Permalink 2 Comments

Weekly Assignment #4

September 14, 2006 at 2:09 pm (Weekly Assignments)

For this week’s assignment, I’d be especially interested in seeing questions and answers about Victorian culture, social issues, and philosophy as suggested by “In Memoriam A. H. H.” in addition to questions about Tennyson himself.

The first part of the weekly assignment is to ask a question about the reading for this week — a real question; i.e., something you don’t know the answer to. ONE sentence only, please: questions of more than one sentence will not receive credit. I might give an extra point for great questions. Questions are due by midnight on Monday. Late questions will not be given credit.

The second part of the weekly assignment is to answer someone’s question (not your own). You must cite at least one authoritative source. (I will withhold credit for answers without a reference. If you make a sui generis argument, find an authority to support it, or else find an authority to testily contradict.) These answers can be as long as you like; I might give an extra point for great answers. Answers are due by midnight on Wednesday. Late answers will not be given credit.

Submit all questions and answers as comments to this post. Feel free to post other commentary in the comments, as well.

Permalink 29 Comments

Tennyson reading poetry

September 14, 2006 at 1:58 pm (General)

You can listen to Tennyson reading from “The Charge of the Light Brigade” at The Poetry Archive. There, you can also listen to another charming dactylic poem by Andrew Motion, “The Dog of the Light Brigade.” The latter is indicative of just how comic Tennyson’s unsubtle metrical tricks sound to modern ears.

I have also managed to figure out the simplest way for you to listen to Tennyson reading from “Maud.” (These historic recordings, as I mentioned, were made circa 1890 by Thomas Edison himself.) The recording is included in an audiobook titled Poetry On Record: 98 Poets Read Their Work (1888-2006) (Shout! Factory, 2006), and there’s an excerpt from “Come Into the Garden, Maud” available on Amazon.com. In this excerpt, Tennyson is reading the following lines:

She is coming, my own, my sweet;
Were it ever so airy a tread,
My heart would hear her and beat,
Were it earth in an earthy bed;
My dust would hear her and beat,
Had I lain for a century dead;
Would start and tremble under her feet,
And blossom in purple and red.

Permalink Leave a Comment

Weekly Assignment #3

September 11, 2006 at 4:30 pm (General)

Sorry: I forgot to post this week’s assignment! It’s the same as always, of course. If you’ve already posted a question, you don’t need to re-post it here (although that would make things a bit more convenient).

The first part of the weekly assignment is to ask a question about the reading for this week — a real question; i.e., something you don’t know the answer to. ONE sentence only, please: questions of more than one sentence will not receive credit. I might give an extra point for great questions. Questions are due by midnight on Monday. Late questions will not be given credit.

The second part of the weekly assignment is to answer someone’s question (not your own). You must cite at least one authoritative source. (I will withhold credit for answers without a reference. If you make a sui generis argument, find an authority to support it, or else find an authority to testily contradict.) These answers can be as long as you like; I might give an extra point for great answers. Answers are due by midnight on Wednesday. Late answers will not be given credit.

Submit all questions and answers as comments to this post. Feel free to post other commentary in the comments, as well.

Permalink 33 Comments

Wrong again . . .

September 5, 2006 at 2:43 pm (General)

By the way, in class the other day I mixed up Sara Teasdale with Fiona MacLeod. Sorry about that.

Permalink 5 Comments

Weekly Assignment #2

September 5, 2006 at 2:41 pm (Weekly Assignments)

The first part of the weekly assignment is to ask a question about the reading for this week — a real question; i.e., something you don’t know the answer to. ONE sentence only, please: questions of more than one sentence will not receive credit. I might give an extra point for great questions. Questions are due by midnight on Monday. Late questions will not be given credit.

The second part of the weekly assignment is to answer someone’s question (not your own). You must cite at least one authoritative source. (I will withhold credit for answers without a reference. If you make a sui generis argument, find an authority to support it, or else find an authority to testily contradict.) These answers can be as long as you like; I might give an extra point for great answers. Answers are due by midnight on Wednesday. Late answers will not be given credit.

Submit all questions and answers as comments to this post. Feel free to post other commentary in the comments, as well.

By the way, I adore that Billy Collins poem “Nightclub”; it’s one of my all-time favorite love poems. However, I don’t see even a smidgen of similitude between it and anything EBB wrote. Sorry. Perhaps a well-written essay would convince me.

Permalink 23 Comments

Weekly Assignment #1

August 29, 2006 at 2:40 pm (Weekly Assignments)

The first part of the weekly assignment is to ask a question about the reading for this week — a real question; i.e., something you don’t know the answer to. ONE sentence only, please: questions of more than one sentence will not receive credit. I might give an extra point for great questions. Questions are due by midnight on Monday. Late questions will not be accepted.

The second part of the weekly assignment is to answer someone’s question (not your own). You must cite at least one authoritative source. These answers can be as long as you like; I might give an extra point for great answers. Answers are due by midnight on Wednesday. Late answers will not be accepted.

Submit all questions and answers as comments to this post. Feel free to post other commentary in the comments, as well.

Permalink 28 Comments

« Previous page